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Benson Pest Management
P.O. Box 521
Milford, Maine 04461

Cell: 207 - 478 - 2362
Office: 207 - 827 - 4961

Email: pbktim@aol.com

Maine Board of Pesticides Control
Master Commercial Applicator
Maine Department of Fish And Wildlife ADC Agent

BENSON PEST MANAGEMENT
Pest And Wildlife Management Specialist

BATS PAGE

Benson Pest Management Logo

Maine Based Residential and Commercial Pest Control Services

 

Eliminating Carpenter Ants, Acrobat Ants, Cornfield Ants, Pavement Ants, Fire Ants, Bats, Mice and Rats, Flying Squirrels, Stinging Insects, Roaches, Spiders, Bed Bugs and More

 

Servicing Bar Harbor, Trenton, Somesville, South West Harbor, Seal Harbor, North East Harbor, Deere Isle, Stonington, Blue Hill, Castine, Brooklin, Penobscot, Orland, Ellsworth, Dedham, Holden, Lincoln, Enfield, Bangor, Hampden, Carmel, Brewer, Old Town, Orono, Bradley, Milford, Machias, Harrington, Milbridge, Hancock and Sorrento

 

BAT INTRODUCTION AT BENSON PEST MANAGEMENT - EXPERIENCED, CONFIDENT, CONSISTENT, HIGHLY QUALIFIED AND EFFECTIVE

Benson Pest Management Bat Removal And Exclusion In Bar Harbor, Trenton, Somesville, South West Harbor, Seal Harbor, North East Harbor, Deere Isle, Stonington, Blue Hill, Castine, Brooklin, Penobscot, Orland, Ellsworth, Dedham, Holden, Lincoln, Enfield, Bangor, Hampden, Carmel, Brewer, Old Town, Orono, Bradley, Milford, Machias, Harrington, Milbridge, Hancock and Sorrento, Maine

Bats can be a worry, especially when they become unwanted guests in an attic, inside a wall, or in living space. Benson Pest Management in Bangor, Maine is your bat removal specialist! Over time, a colony of bats can grow to a large population, leaving behind a large amount of guano that is benign if left alone but ultimately will create an undesirable odor. Benson Pest Management of Bangor, Maine removes, cleans and disinfects bat guano. It is always safer to hire a Benson Pest Management professional to do the work than to do it yourself. You'll be glad you did.

People are more often concerned about bats because of rabies, a virus that affects the nervous system of humans and all other mammals. If you do not handle bats, your odds of contracting rabies are extremely small. Leave Bat Removal to the pros at Benson Pest Management, a leader in Maine Pest Control. Call Benson Pest Management of Maine for advice at our Cell: 207 - 478 - 2362 or Office: 207 - 827 - 4961.

 

SEE THE EIGHT SPECIES OF BATS IN MAINE

BE PROACTIVE
Schedule A Free Home Inspection
Cell: 207 - 478 - 2362
Office: 207 - 827 - 4961
pbktim@aol.com

Skilled professional pest control services for Carpenter Ants, Acrobat Ants, Cornfield Ants, Pavement Ants, Fire Ants, Bats, Mice and Rats, Flying Squirrels, Stinging Insects, Roaches, Spiders, Bed Bugs and More.

Benson Pest Management of Bangor, Maine Logo

Pests in your home are irritating, conceivably humiliating, destructive and can potentially create a unhealthy living space for your family. You can relax knowing Benson Pest Management is taking on your pest control problems.

What To Expect From Benson Pest Management Bat Removal Service

It's always best to have a professional company like Benson Pest Management to treat your bat issue. We are highly experienced in inspecting properties, locating bat openings, trapping and exclusion techniques, and general removal, so you can rest assured that an effective removal of these pests will take place as quickly as professionally possible.

Bat exclusion is a complicated process involving several steps. First will be the inspection and our inspection fee will be applied to the service fee if you hire us.

Next, Benson Pest Management's Bat Removal will close up all openings bats can use to enter your home. If the openings are left wide open, bats will definitely find their way back in. Finally, Benson Pest Management's bat exclusion techniques are employed to remove all the bats. And finally once the bats are removed Benson Pest Management's bat cleanup crew comes in and does a thourough clean up disinfecting all areas where bat guano was.

Benson Pest Management has access to specialized equipment and knows how to correctly use it. Let Benson Pest Management be your bat removal professional. You'll be glad you did!

The Benson Pest Management Method To Remove and Control Bats

BAT EXCLUSION

The best way to get rid of bats, and also the safest for bats and humans, is to exclude them. Exclusion is Bat Removal Pro's method of removing bats.

Exclusion is a two-step process. The first step is to use a one-way door which allows bats to exit a structure, but prevents them from reentering. Benson Pest Management also uses one-way tubes where one-way doors won't work, such as on horizontal surfaces, and performs the same task as a one way door.

Once the bats are out, step two, Sealing, begins. We need to seal off any opening that a bat can get through. We seal large openings with aluminum flashing, wood, or quarter-inch mesh hardware cloth. Bangor Pest Removal will stuff small holes around pipes, cracks, and gaps in shakes and tiles with balled-up galvanized window screening, pieces of fiberglass insulation, copper Stuff-it®, or copper or stainless-steel mesh scouring pads. We use weather-stripping, caulk, or expandable foam, seal spaces around doors, windows, and vents. We also replace loose boards and roofing materials. We also use caulk or expandable foam, apply it early in the day so that it is set up and no longer sticky when bats inspect the area in the evening. If there are large areas to be foamed, Benson Pest Management of Bangor has a high end foam gun of the type used in building construction.

If a bat flies into your home it's probably a juvenile learning to fly, a solitary male following prey, or an adult that has been excluded from its roost. Bats often enter through an open door or window, or by coming down a chimney into an unused fireplace. If a bat is found inside during the day, confine it to one room. Place a towel under doors to prevent the bat from moving into other parts of the house. Then call Benson Pest Management of Maine for advice at our Cell: 207 - 478 - 2362 or Office: 207 - 827 - 49.

BAT GUANO(FECES) CLEANUP AND DISINFECTING

Once bats are out and your home is sealed Benson Pest Management of Maine begins bat guano cleanup. You should not do this yourself! Bat guano can carry a fungus known to cause Histoplasmosis. You do not want to breathe the feces and you want to avoid contact with feces. Benson Pest Management has specialized hepta filter equipment that filters the air during guano removal and we have and high end chemical sprayers to disinfect all bat guano areas with chemical mixtures that will not harm you, your children or your pets.

Benson Pest Management - Bat Control and Removal In Bar Harbor, Trenton, Somesville, South West Harbor, Seal Harbor, North East Harbor, Deere Isle, Stonington, Blue Hill, Castine, Brooklin, Penobscot, Orland, Ellsworth, Dedham, Holden, Lincoln, Enfield, Bangor, Hampden, Carmel, Brewer, Old Town, Orono, Bradley, Milford, Machias, Harrington, Milbridge, Hancock and Sorrento Maine

Benson Pest Management of Maine covers Bar Harbor, Trenton, Somesville, South West Harbor, Seal Harbor, North East Harbor, Deere Isle, Stonington, Blue Hill, Castine, Brooklin, Penobscot, Orland, Ellsworth, Dedham, Holden, Lincoln, Enfield, Bangor, Hampden, Carmel, Brewer, Old Town, Orono, Bradley, Milford, Machias, Harrington, Milbridge, Hancock and Sorrento Maine and will be glad to assist you if you have a bat problem. Benson Pest Management of Maine has designed plans to protect buildings from bats with the conditions that exist in Maine in mind. We have our Maine masters license for pest control, the highest license attainable in the state of Maine. Many companies employ seasonal workers that only have an operators level license - not Benson Pest Management of Maine!

Rest assured if you have a any pest problem in the Bar Harbor, Trenton, Somesville, South West Harbor, Seal Harbor, North East Harbor, Deere Isle, Stonington, Blue Hill, Castine, Brooklin, Penobscot, Orland, Ellsworth, Dedham, Holden, Lincoln, Enfield, Bangor, Hampden, Carmel, Brewer, Old Town, Orono, Bradley, Milford, Machias, Harrington, Milbridge, Hancock and Sorrento, Maine area our Benson Pest Management of Maine experts will be able to help resolve any pest issues.

 

There Are Eight Bat Species In Maine

Bats are the only mammals capable of true flight. With extremely elongated fingers and a wing membrane stretched between, the bat’s wing anatomically resembles the human hand. Almost 1,000 bat species can be found worldwide. In fact, bats make up a quarter of all mammal species on earth!

Some bat species hibernate in Maine during the winter, called hibernating bats, and other bat species migrate south for the winter, called tree bats.

The five bat hibernating bat species present in Maine are:

Hibernating Bats

  1. Big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus)
  2. Little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus)
  3. Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis)
  4. Eastern small-footed bat (Myotis leibii)
  5. Tri-colored bat (Pipistrellus subflavus)

The three tree bat species present in Maine are:

Tree Bats

  1. Hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus)
  2. Silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans)
  3. Eastern Red bat (Lasiurus borealis)

A disease called White-nose syndrome (WNS) is causing the decline of several hibernating bat species in Northeast North America, including in Maine. Learn more about the disease and WNS in Maine.

 

BATS ARE REALLY GOOD PEST EXTERMINATORS!
Many bats eat a wide variety of bugs! By doing this, bats reduce the amount of pesticides farmers need to use (which also means less pesticides polluting the environment) and they reduce the amount of produce damaged by pests (which means more food for us!). Recently scientists estimated that bats in the United States have save us somewhere between $3.7 and 54 billion in pest control services every year. Bats have been documented eating bugs that attack pecans, almonds, rice, cotton, corn, coffee, sugarcane, tomatoes, cucumbers and beans.

THE 5 MAINE HIBERNATING BATS

Big Brown Bat

Big Brown Bat Image at Benson Pest Management In Maine

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Eptesicus fuscus

OTHER NAMES: night owl bat

STATUS: Found statewide and common. Low Conservation Concern.

DESCRIPTION: Big brown bats are one of the largest North American bats. They average 4 - 5 inches in length and weigh 0.5 -1.2 ounces at adulthood with wingspans of 12-16 inches. These bats have a glossy brown color on the back and a lighter belly color. They have small rounded black ears that are leathery in texture and nearly hairless. The wing membranes and tail are also black. Their heads are rather large with a broad nose and fleshy lips.

DISTRIBUTION: The big brown bat is one of the most common bat species in North America. It can be found from northern Canada throughout the United States and Mexico.

HABITAT: Big brown bats occupy almost all habitat types. They seem to do well in forests, open areas, suburban, and urban areas. Big brown bats will roost under loose bark of trees, in caves, buildings, bat houses, and even under bridges. They are commonly found inhabiting bat houses, attics, and louvered attic vents. These bats are the most likely species of bats that people will encounter due to their abundant numbers and their ability to live in close proximity to humans.

FEEDING HABITS: They are insectivorous mainly foraging on beetles with their rather large and powerful teeth. They will also consume other flying insects such as flies, moths, wasps, and flying ants, which they capture while in flight.

LIFE HISTORY AND ECOLOGY: Big brown bats sleep during daylight hours and emerge from their roosts at dusk to feed throughout the night. The big brown bat is considered to be one of the fastest species of bats reaching speeds of up to 40 mph. Mating occurs during the fall and early winter before hibernation. During this time females form maternity roosts, and males roost alone or in small groups. Females store sperm, and fertilization takes place in spring. Females give birth between late May and early July to one or two young that are born naked, blind, and deaf. Within a few hours their eyes and ears open. They are able to fly within six weeks and become independent within a few weeks of first flight. Maternity colonies disperse once the young become independent.

Little Brown Bat

Little Brown Bat Image at Benson Pest Management In Maine

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Myotis lucifugus (LeConte)

OTHER NAMES: Little Brown Bat (Fenton and Barclay 1980, Harvey et al. 1999).

STATUS: Likely found statewide. Once common throughout its distribution, it is becoming increasingly rare in the eastern U.S. due to the fungal affliction White-nose Syndrome which is devastating some local populations.

DESCRIPTION: A medium-sized myotis (total length, 8-10 cm [3.2-3.5 in.]; weight, 5.5-9.5 g [0.2-0.3 oz.] with a dark-brown dorsum and sleek and glossy pelage, often with a metallic sheen. Venter is paler, sometimes slightly grayish, and ears and wing membranes are brownish. In addition, presence of hairs on the feet that extend beyond the toes of little brown myotis is a useful characteristic in distinguishing between these species (Barbour and Davis 1969, Fenton and Barclay 1980, Choate et al. 1994). Subspecies of eastern North America is M. l. lucifugus (Fenton and Barclay 1980, Hall 1981a).

DISTRIBUTION: The broadest distribution of any North American myotis; except for the southern Great Plains, extreme Southwest, and parts of the Southeast, it occurs from northern Alaska into the southern United States and from coast to coast (Fenton and Barclay 1980, Hall 1981a).

HABITAT: Colonies may be in tree cavities, underneath rocks, in piles of wood, in crevices, occasionally in caves, and in a variety of human-made structures. Will roost in any sites with appropriate microclimates, and they quickly locate and exploit new roosts (Barbour and Davis 1969, Fenton and Barclay 1980, Choate et al. 1994).

FEEDING HABITS: A variety of insects are consumed, including flies, moths, and small beetles.

LIFE HISTORY AND ECOLOGY: Maternity colonies of up to several thousand females begin forming in spring, frequently in warm buildings including attics of occupied houses. They may use the same maternity sites year after year. Males and nonreproductive females roost singly or in small groups in warm months. Roost sites are near water. Dispersal from winter hibernacula ranges from short distances to 500 kilometers (300 miles). Forage at dusk, frequenting the same areas night after night. Usual flight path is over water (lakes, ponds, streams, and rivers) and along edges of woodlands. Small insects are eaten in flight, but will land to consume larger prey. Lactating bats tend to select larger insects than males or nonreproductive females, but chironomids are still the staple food. Tend to take insects three to 10 millimeters (0.1-0.4 inch) in length. Their rapid rate of mastication (seven jaw cycles per second), short time for passage of food through the digestive tract (35-54 minutes), and rapid feeding in clumps of insects, appear to be specializations for minimizing between-capture intervals and maximizing rate of turnover of food. Ability to exploit a wide range of roosts and foods probably contributes to large populations of this species in many parts of distribution. Hibernation occurs October-April. Caves and mines with relatively high humidity and cold temperatures are typical hibernacula. Hibernate singly or in small clusters, hanging from the wall or ceiling, or wedging themselves into cracks and crevices. Hibernacula often are shared with other species of bats. Mating occurs directly before hibernation, but copulating pairs may be found in the hibernaculum throughout winter. Fertilization occurs after ovulation in spring when females arouse from hibernation. Timing of these events is influenced by local conditions, resulting in earlier dates for parturition in more southerly parts of distribution. Gestation is 50-60 days. One young (rarely twins) is born in spring. During parturition, females reverse their usual head-down posture so that neonate is born into the interfemoral membrane. Young use deciduous incisors, along with large thumbs and hind feet, to cling to mother. Growth is rapid; they can fly at three weeks old. Maximum lifespan of several individuals in the wild was more than 30 years. Average lifespan probably is 10-15 years (Barbour and Davis 1969, Fenton and Barclay 1980, Choate et al. 1994, Harvey et al. 1999).

Northern Long Eared Bat

Northern Long Eared Bat at Benson Pest Management In Maine

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Myotis septentrionalis (Trouessart)

OTHER NAMES: Northern Myotis, Keen’s Myotis

STATUS: Found statewide. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the northern long-eared bat as threatened with an Interim 4(d) Rule in April of 2015. HIGH CONSERVATION CONCERN.

DESCRIPTION: Similar in appearance to other small (forearm length = 34.6-38.8 mm [1.4-1.5 in.], wingspan = 228-258 mm [8.9-10.1 in.]; weight ~ 5-10 g [0.2-0.4 ozs.]), light brown bats of the genus Myotis (Caceres and Barclay 2000). Differ from other Myotis by having longer ears that extend approximately four millimeters [0.2 inch] beyond nose and, a longer, more sharply pointed, tragus. No sexual dichromatism; however, females tend to be larger than males (Barbour and Davis 1969).

DISTRIBUTION: Throughout much of Canada and eastern United States, extending south through Alabama and Georgia and into northern Florida.

HABITAT: Strongly associated with forested habitats. Tends to forage beneath forest canopy along ridges and hillsides. In winter, individuals hibernate in caves and abandoned mines, often with other species of bats. Easily overlooked in caves as this small bat often will roost in narrow crevices where they are not easily observed (Whitaker and Hamilton 1998). During summer months, females form small maternity colonies in hollow trees, under exfoliating bark, or in buildings. Isolated males can be found in caves year-round.

FEEDING HABITS: Opportunistic feeders, consuming a variety of prey. Reported to consume insects from Orders Lepidoptera, Neuroptera, Hemiptera, Homoptera, Diptera, Coleoptera, Trichoptera, Ephemeroptera, and Hymen-optera.

LIFE HISTORY AND ECOLOGY: Often observed swarming in the entrances of caves or mines prior to hibernation, usually in August or September. Mating occurs at this time. Usually hibernates in small groups or roosts singly in narrow crevices. After hibernating, females emerge and often form small maternity colonies of up to 100 individuals in nearby trees. Roost trees often found in close proximity, allowing females to choose among a variety of roosting conditions. Males and nonreproductive females usually roost singly, or form small colonies.

Parturition can be delayed until July at more northern latitudes. Volant young have been observed as early as July. Short, wide wings and longer tail membranes enable them to fly at slow speeds through more cluttered habitats. These characteristics in addition to having long ears indicate species may glean insects from vegetation. These adaptations likely allow them to capture aerial as well as stationary prey in forested habitats.

Eastern Small Footed Bat

Northern Long Eared Bat at Benson Pest Management In Maine

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Myotis leibii

OTHER NAMES: Small-footed bat

STATUS: Found statewide. HIGHEST CONSERVATION CONCERN.

DESCRIPTION: The smallest species of Myotis with a length of 2.5 to 3.5 inches and weights up to about 0.30 ounces. Can be distinguished by characteristically small feet relative to total body size. The body fur is a tan to golden brown color with its face and ears having a blackish appearance that gives the impression of a masked face.

DISTRIBUTION: Myotis leibii is found in the eastern United States, north to eastern Canada, south to Alabama and Georgia and west to Oklahoma. They are also found in Missouri, southern Illinois, and Arkansas.

HABITAT: Eastern small-footed myotis hibernates in caves, mines, rock shelters, or cliff fissures. They prefer lower humidity near the entrances of these type shelters where temperatures may drop below freezing. They use places such as buildings and barns during the summer time. It is believed that the small-footed myotis feeds on insects located near forests and forest edges.

FEEDING HABITS: Feeds almost entirely on insects such as moths, true flies, and beetles. Have also been documented feeding on small arthropods and some vegetation. Crickets and grasshoppers comprise a large portion of their diet.

LIFE HISTORY AND ECOLOGY: A migratory species, though little is known about its migration and summer roosting habits. Eastern small-footed bats may be found under bridges, in barns, rock crevices, or dilapidated buildings. They have been observed roosting singly and with groups of up to 20. Breeding occurs during September-October, birthing one pup during May-June with an average gestation period of 55 days. Is a nocturnal species feeding primarily one hour after sunset and one hour before sunrise, respectively. Has a lifespan of up to nine years.

Tri Colored Bat

Northern Long Eared Bat at Benson Pest Management In Maine

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Perimyotis subflavus

OTHER NAMES: Brown bat, little brown bat, pipistrelle, pip.

STATUS: Found statewide and common. Lowest Conservation Concern.

DESCRIPTION: The tri-colored bat is one of the smallest North American bats. It varies in length from 2.8 - 3.74 inches and weighs between 0.2-0.3 ounces. The wingspan is eight to ten inches. The dorsal fur is tricolored when parted – each hair having a dark base, a lighter middle, and a yellow-brown tip. Forearms are pinkish to flesh-colored. The tragus (external ear covering) is generally oval or rounded, distinguishing it from the sharp tragus of Myotis bats.

DISTRIBUTION: Tri-colored bats occur in eastern Canada, most of the eastern United States and southward through eastern Mexico to Central America.

HABITAT: Tri-colored bats occupy a wider variety of habitats than perhaps any other bat in Alabama. They may be found hibernating in caves, mines and rock crevices during winter. Almost any cave of some size is likely to contain tri-colored bats during winter months. During summer, they are found in smaller numbers in caves and also roost in hollow trees, under tree bark, in brush piles and to a limited extent in buildings. They may use artificial roosting boxes (bat houses) during the summer. Tri-colored bats are solitary bats and when found roosting are usually found singly, though rarely two to three may cluster together.

FEEDING HABITS: They are insectivorous, eating a wide variety of insects including moths, beetles, mosquitoes, night midges, flies, and ants.

LIFE HISTORY AND ECOLOGY: Tri-colored bats roost and sleep during the day and are active at night. They are slow flyers and forage over waterways and around forest edges. Insects may be caught in the wing or tail membrane during flight, and eaten “on the wing.” Mating occurs in the fall. The female will store the sperm during the winter and fertilization takes place in the spring. One or two young are born late May thru early July hairless and pink in late spring and cannot fly for about a month. For the first few days after birth, the female will carry the young while she forages. Tri-colors hibernate during the winter.

As with most wild mammals, tri-colored bats can and do contract and transmit rabies. Though the incidence of rabies in pips is very low, any bat that appears sick or cannot fly should be avoided. The tri-colored bat is a very beneficial species and - like all Alabama bats - are a natural means of insect control.

 

 

THE 3 MAINE TREE BATS

Hoary Bat

Hoary Bat at Benson Pest Management In Maine

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Lasiurus cinereus

OTHER NAMES: Hoary Bat

STATUS: Poorly known. Found statewide. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN.

DESCRIPTION: Lasiurus cinereus is the largest bat species in Alabama and is very colorful and heavily furred. It is also one of the largest bats in North America with a weight of about one ounce and a wingspan of 13 to 16 inches. Body fur is a mixed brownish-gray, tinged with white, giving it the frosted or “hoary” appearance. Much of the face and neck fur is a mustard-yellow. The ears are short, rounded and are lined in black. As with many of the forest bats, a hoary’s wings are much more extensively covered in fur than many of the smaller cave dwelling bat species.

DISTRIBUTION: The hoary bat is one of the most widespread of North American bats occurring in almost all of the continental United States, Mexico and southern Canada. It also occurs in Iceland, Bermuda and the Dominican Republic. It is the only bat found in Hawaii and this Hawaiian subspecies is considered endangered. This bat leave Maine each fall to spend the winter in the southern United Sates, and return each spring.

HABITAT: Hoary bats are considered forest dwellers. They can be found hanging in foliage usually near forest edges. The roost is usually 10 or more feet high where vegetation covers them above but is clear below. They are seldom found in bat houses or human buildings. Occasionally, they are found in caves near the entrance.

FEEDING HABITS: They are usually insectivorous, eating a wide variety of insects including moths, beetles and night midges. Very rarely, other bats may be caught as food.

LIFE HISTORY AND ECOLOGY: Hoary bats roost and sleep during the day and are active at night. They are swift and direct flyers as compared with most other Maine bats. This flight pattern, along with their large size, makes them easily identifiable. They forage along streams, over clearcuts, and along the edges of waterways and forests. The sexes apparently segregate during the summer. During the summer, one to four young may be born, but two is the usual number. Young cling to the female during the day, but are left at night while she forages for food. Hoary bats are considered solitary bats and are usually found roosting alone. They may associate during the reproductive season, while young are with the mother, and perhaps as small groups during migration.

As with most wild mammals, hoary bats can and do contract and transmit rabies. Though the incidence of rabies in any bat is very low, any bat that appears sick or cannot fly should be avoided. The hoary bat is a very beneficial species and like all bats are a natural means of insect control.

Silver Haired Bat

Silver Haired Bat at Benson Pest Management In Maine

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Lasionycteris noctivagans

OTHER NAMES: None

STATUS: Poorly known. Probably found statewide. Little known of distribution and habits in Maine. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN

DESCRIPTION: Silver haired bats are forest-dwelling and are very distinctive in appearance from other bats. They have dark, blackish-brown fur which is tinged or “frosted” with silver, hence their descriptive common name “silver-haired.” Their wingspan is 27-33 cm (11-13 inches) and they weigh 8-15 grams (0.3-0.5 ounce). Their ears are short and rounded.

DISTRIBUTION: Silver haired bats are found from southern Canada southward through most of the continental United States and into northeastern Mexico. This bats leave Maine each fall to spend the winter in the southern United Sates, and return each spring.

HABITAT: Silver-haired bats are considered forest-dwelling bats, and use deciduous, coniferous, and mixed woodlands. Some evidence indicates that they may have a preference for “old forest” systems. They roost under loose tree bark, in cavities in living trees, in dead trees, and in bird nests. They are found occasionally in open artificial structures such as sheds, garages, and outbuildings, but they almost never use caves, enclosed buildings, or artificial bat houses. During migration, they also may be found in piles of logs, rocks, or brush.

FEEDING HABITS: They are insectivorous, eating a wide variety of night flying insects including moths, beetles, mosquitoes, night midges, flies, and termites.

LIFE HISTORY AND ECOLOGY: Silver-haired bats roost and sleep during the day, and are active at night. Insects may be caught in the wing or tail membrane during flight and eaten “on the wing.” Silver-haired bats are very slow flyers and, accordingly, are easily recognized in flight. They usually fly fairly high and relatively straight while foraging along stream corridors and over woodland ponds. Mating occurs in the fall, but implantation of the embryo in the uterus is delayed until spring. Young (usually twins) are born during early summer in the northern portion of their range.

When caught or handled, silver-haired bats can be very aggressive. As with most wild mammals, they can and do contract and transmit rabies. Indeed, most rabies contracted by humans is associated with a variant of th virus found in Silver-haired Bats. Though the incidence of rabies in any bat is very low, any bat that appears sick or cannot fly should be avoided. The silver-haired bat is a very beneficial species and, like all of Alabama’s bats, help to naturally control insect populations.

Eastern Red Bat

Silver Haired Bat at Benson Pest Management In Maine

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Lasiurus borealis

OTHER NAMES: Found statewide and common. Lowest Conservation Concern.

STATUS: Poorly known. Probably found statewide. Little known of distribution and habits in Maine. MODERATE CONSERVATION CONCERN

DESCRIPTION: Eastern red bats are medium-sized, forest-dwelling bats. As with many members of the genus Lasiurus, red bats are heavily furred. Fur covers most of the body, including most of the wings and tail. Individuals may exhibit considerable variation in pelage color, ranging from bright orange-red, to orange-brown, to light brown. Many of the hairs are tipped with white. Light brown individuals are often confused with the closely related Seminole bat, Lasiurus seminolus; however, Seminole bats are a much darker mahogany-brown. Female red rats usually are much paler than males. Both sexes have a distinctive, white-furred, “collar” and white patch of fur located near the thumb. The wingspan of red bats is 11-13 inches and they weigh 0.3-0.5 ounces. Their ears are short and rounded. With their heavy red fur, frosting, and white collar, eastern red bats generally are regarded as one of the most beautiful bats in Maine.

DISTRIBUTION: Eastern red bats occur from southern Canada southward through most of the eastern continental United States (except extreme south Florida) and into northeastern Mexico.

HABITAT: Red bats are forest-dwelling bats and inhabit deciduous, coniferous, and mixed woodlands. They forage along forest edges, and flyway corridors of streams and woods roads. They roost in the foliage of trees, often hanging by one foot, and look, superficially, like dead leaves. Caves, buildings, and artificial bat houses are rarely used as roost sites. In southern portions of their range, they sometimes roost in clumps of Spanish moss. In colder regions, they may hibernate in hollow trees and leaf litter. Red bats are common in forested urban areas where they regularly feed around streetlights.

FEEDING HABITS: They are insectivorous, eating a wide variety of night-flying insects including moths, beetles, mosquitoes, flies, and cicadas. Insects may be caught in the wing or tail membrane during flight and eaten “on the wing.”

LIFE HISTORY AND ECOLOGY: Red bats roost and sleep during the day and are active at night; however, it is not uncommon to see them flying early in the afternoon during summer and in daylight on warm winter days. They are solitary when roosting, but small groups of individuals often forage together. Red bats mate in the fall, often during flight, but embryo implantation is delayed until spring. One to four (usually three) young are born during early summer. Females carry their young while flying. Red bats in colder portions of their range migrate south in the autumn.

As with most wild mammals, the eastern red bat can and does contract and transmit rabies. Though the incidence of rabies in bats is very low, any bat that appears sick or cannot fly should be avoided. The eastern red bat is a very beneficial species, and, like all of Maine’s bats, are a natural means of insect control.

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